Sam Tudor- Quotidian Dream


photo by Ivana Besenovsky


The Vancouver based Sam Tudor’s Quotidian Dream is what Tudor calls his first album technically but third in actuality. Tudor is a young and brilliant folk musician who artfully obsesses over his homemade soundscapes. The 22 year old is wise beyond his years yet his music drips with youthful authenticity. The album is quite spectacular; it invites you into the dusty basement of Tudors psyche and makes you feel right at home. The ten song strong record is ambitiously emotional, vulnerable and complicated. Tudor experiments with generous lyrical metaphors and intense transparency. The album begins with the track New Apartment that immediately sets the tone in its wise songwriting paired by haunting musical backdrop. It features the shattering lyrics: washing up on a beach of carpet / you were drowned and you found the shore. Little things that keep you sober / keep them close when I’m far away. As the tide is moving lower / I think it’s time for you to stay. This is followed by the brazen track Quotidian Boy that unabashedly investigates the facets of childhood difficulty. The album continues to generously explore the depths of the beautiful and tragic human experience. The final track Silver Lining Skies provides a sense of closure, making one feel that they’re never alone in that awkward moment between birth and death.

Tudor grew up in a small town outside of Williams Lake and played music throughout his adolescence. He shared that “In the past I didn’t know what I was doing sound wise. It was hard enough trying to make something that sounded good. I didn’t have the mental energy to actually think about an album’s aesthetic. I was just trying to make an album that didn’t fall apart”. This self-deprecation certainly paid off as Tudor learned to refine his particular brand, which is severely fragile and rare. He manages to pull off Andy Shauf-esque velvet melancholy that dances in depression. Tudor further explained “ I am much more confident now and know how to record and write, so I can put more intention into the actual sound. That’s why although this is my third record, it feels like my debut album”.

Quotidian Dream does feel like a debut album in the way Ryan Adam’s Heartbreaker is his debut album. It is triumphant declaration of musical catharsis that is waiting to be heard and not just heard but cherished. Tudor produced the album himself and mostly in his bedroom, yes he is obnoxiously talented. He is joined by an avalanche of local talent such as Harry Tudor on drums and percussion, Jasper Wrinch on electric bass, Nathan Turner on upright bass and Tegan Wahlgren on violin, viola and vocals. The musical landscape is rich and transporting which impossibly intuitive to the lyrical tapestry. Quotidian Dream is an uncommon invitation to the intimacy of one’s honest internal exploration; there is nothing quotidian about him.



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